Lino Tagliapietra | “Painting in Glass” at the Philadelphia Museum

Lino Tagliapietra‘s Painting in Glass, on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, now through July 16, 2017.

rfj0212-web

Giuditta, (detail) Fused glass panel, 2013.  photo: Russell Johnson

Lino Tagliapietra is best known as one of the world’s preeminent glassblowers. He imbues each of his vessels with a rare elegance and intelligence. The contours of his Dinosaurs turn gracefully, his avventurine works dazzle, and each new series of Tagliapietra’s demands not only renewed contemplation of great beauty, but also renewed reflection on the locus of Lino’s work in terms of history, tradition, and inspiration.

giuditta-process

Lino composing Giuditta in 2013 at Bullseye Glass in Portland Oregon. photo Jen Elek

A Maestro of Glass since age twenty-one, Lino Tagliapietra has kept us admiring and thinking with every twist of the blowpipe for over sixty years. Recently, however, the artist surprised us in a new way, diverging from blown glass to explore a new method within his dedicated medium. As always, Tagliapietra reveals both his mastery of and ability to seamlessly reinvent traditional techniques, employing murrini and cane in the creation of works that read as glass paintings, or more properly, constitute kiln-fused glass panels.

_rbj2815-8-bit-print

Porta con Finestra, (Door with a Window), inspired by the colorful houses on the island of Burano. photo: Russell Johnson

Lino Tagliapietra’s panels have garnered many comparisons to paintings by artists like Rothko, Klimt, and Van Gogh, placing Tagliapietra’s work in conversation with that of Western Civilization’s greatest painters. Though a Modernist aesthetic presents itself throughout the body of Lino’s work, perhaps his Modernism is most easily sensed in what could be considered one of the glass artist’s most experimental, or unconventional, series.

img_6285

Lino at work on the Chicago panel in Portland Oregon. photo: Jen Elek

His panels represent risk, a new way of seeing, unyielding exploration, and an unquenchable vitality that pushes past fear and apprehension. As Lino said of his panels, “it’s a big effort with myself to go and explore in this direction. It feels a bit scary to go to the gallery with work like this. But it’s a huge opportunity…”

chicago-panel_rrj0420-web

Chicago, 2015, 31.5 x 39.5 x .75 “

We are grateful and humbled to be able to watch as the Maestro transcends conventions and limitations. Lino Tagliapietra inspires with his work, but also with his immense talent, unparalleled dedication, and relentless search to experience and share that next new sense of wonder.

Many thanks to the curators, Andrew Page and Elisabeth Agro.  Andrew Page is the editor-in-chief of GLASS: The UrbanGlass Art Quarterly, who works with art critics, museum curators, and practicing artists to put the most important work being done in glass into a critical context. Elisabeth Agro has served as Associate Curator of American Modern and Contemporary Crafts and Decorative Arts at the Philadelphia Museum of Art since June 2006.  Thank you also to sponsors of the show, including The Leonard and Norma Klorfine Foundation Endowed Fund for Modern and Contemporary Craft, the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Be sure to visit Schantz Galleries in Stockbridge to see an exceptional variety of fused glass panels by Lino Tagliapietra.  

img_5181

Elizabeth Agro, Lino Tagliapietra and Norma Klorfine at the opening event.

lina-and-anna-with-field-of-flowers

Lina Tagliapietra and Anna Ferro with “Field of Flowers“.

 

lino-with-genesis

Visitors with Lino Tagliapietra, at the opening reception viewing “Genesis, Evolution“.

Posted in ART, Artist, GALLERY NEWS, museum | Tagged , , , , , , ,

LINO TAGLIAPIETRA | INSPIRATIONS

2016-november-lino-sofa-contarini-1024x559

Lino Tagliapietra continues to share his experience as a technically masterful glass blower, teacher and artist who travels the world in search of inspiration for his work. This thirst for discovery mirrors one of his favorite explorers, Corto Maltese, a character from an early graphic novel by Italian comic book artist Hugo Pratt (1927-1995), who was venerated for fantastical stories and graphic dexterity.  An interesting sidebar is that Lino’s wife, (Lina Ongaro), of over 56 years had and uncle who also was an artist who worked alongside Pratt when he was in Venice. Through the artwork and stories, Lino found a simpatico spirit and fellow adventurer in the tales of Corto’s travels as told through Pratt’s art.

forcole_trio-762x1024

Fórcole, 2016, 38 3/4 x 11 x 8″; 38 1/2 x 14 x 8″; 37 x 11 x 8″ photo: Kim Saul

This year at SOFA Chicago, Lino Tagliapietra will debut several new series—Cayuga, Contarini and Fórcole—all reminiscent of places or experiences visited or imagined by the artist; he also continues to explore both panel glass and the sumptuous and challenging avventurine with a five Dinosaur Installation. Lino is forever striving to find new inspirations, forms, and techniques as well as opportunities to make his work.

Gondolier against beautiful sunset in Venice, Italy

Gondolier in Venice, see the fórcole, on which the oar is resting.

Fórcole, which Tagliapietra designed specifically for this show, are named after the rowlocks found on the gondolas in the beautiful lagoons of his native Venice. In this body of work, he re-imagines the centuries-old tradition of making fórcole, metamorphosing a functional object into sculpture. With remarkable technical ability, he communicates his expressive aesthetic and his light, intelligent, and inspiring presence. The strength and beauty of the glass parallels the natural vitality of the young wood that becomes fórcole. As with traditional Venetian oarlocks, each of Tagliapietra’s Fórcole requires an impressive amount of time and labor. Much as the wood must first be carefully chosen, hewn, seasoned, carved, and then finished with sandpaper and a sealant, so the glass and colors must first be made, blown into a shape, cut from the vessel, carved with battuto, shaped through slumping in a kiln, and polished. The Maestro has stated that it will be some time before he creates additional Fórcole because the amount of work that goes into each piece is so staggering.

rxj4448-web

Cayuga, 2016, 21 1/2 x 14 1/2 x 7 1/2″ photo: Russell Johnson

Cayuga experiments with shape as the compressed sides diverge from Lino’s more trademark symmetry. Lino worked with this form in May of this year at the MIT hot shop in Cambridge, MA and was very excited about the shape of the vessel. The sensual piece in this exhibition was made a few months later, at the GAS conference in at the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, NY, and named after the nearby Finger Lakes. When he travels to work in different hot shops around the world, Lino prefers to bring his own color which he has special recipes for, and one of his favorites is his own red.

Contarini, 2016

Contarini, 2016, 20 x 9 1/4 x 6″ photo: Russell Johnson

Another new series is the Contarini, first blown May 2016 at the MIT hot shop in Cambridge, MA. Lino’s Contarini— colorful, multilayered vessels with clear murrini and swirling, vertical composition—are defined by wildly mod graphics. They are so named because they reminded Lino of the windows the Palazzo Contarini, in Venice.

palazzo-contarini-620x1024

Palazzo Contarini in Venice

The Contarini family is a noted Venetian family, from which eight Doges led the Venetian Republic forward through ever changing ages between 1043 and 1797. The famous architect, Andrea Palladio, who was employed by the Contarini and their relatives, designed several of the most outstanding neo-classical structures in the Veneto’s environs.

Five Piece Dinosaur Installation, 2016

Dinosaur Installation, 2016, 29 1/2 x 45 3/4 x 5″ photo: Russell Johnson

A true adventurer with the material, another series in Tagliapietra’s recent body of work revitalizes a centuries-old glass-making technique called avventurine (from the Italian for adventure), which began in 17th-century Murano when a member of the Miotti family accidentally dropped some copper filings into a glass batch. The delicate process of incorporating metal into liquid glass then cooling it in low oxygen, reducing atmosphere as the mineral deposits clump gingerly together is capricious and often results in failure. Just to prepare the material is a feat of alchemy. When it works, shimmering striations of crystallized metal suspend wondrously in the glass. As Tagliapietra has described it “…sometimes I feel that it is not glass … but I feel the absolute magic and the preciousness of a material that came from the past.” The serpentine Fenice and the elegant Oca reveal how colors can vary from silver to gold, copper red to blue, purple to green depending on the filtering effects of the colored glass comprising the body of the material, and how the suspended metal deposits can be pulled into assorted shapes.

In Greek and Roman mythology, the Muses were a source of knowledge and the inspirational goddesses of the arts—music, sculpture, poetry and dance. Glass artist Lino Tagliapietra finds his muses all around him. Whether traveling to upstate New York or an island in the South Pacific, glimpsing a water bird stretching her neck to the sky or the reflection of colors in his lagoon, Lino discovers new ideas wherever he finds himself. He is completely open to the experiences of life and perpetually looking forward to the next inspiration.

copy-of-september-2007-756-768x1024

It is rare that the maestro is without his camera, ready to capture the next encounter along his travels and to remind himself later of the colors and spirit of a person, place or time. photo: Jim Schantz

 

Posted in ART, Artist, GALLERY NEWS | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

PETER BREMERS | Earth Dialogue – a collaborative exhibit

schantz-galleries-home-page-peter-bremers-seth-resnick

Marcel Proust wrote that “the real voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” As a way of seeing through new eyes, Schantz Galleries and Sohn Fine Art present a premier collaboration between the two Berkshire art galleries, as well as with two highly regarded artists working in different mediums. Earth Dialogue features over twenty sculptures in glass by Peter Bremers created between 2007 to 2016 and never before seen photographs by Seth Resnick.

The Last Iceberg, 2015

Peter Bremers, The Last Iceberg, 2015, 34.5 x 32 x 6″

In his recent series, Inward Journey, Bremers’ embodies Proust’s assertion that through new experiences we receive “new eyes.” Instead of reflecting an earthly trip, the Inward Journey pieces travel to a mystical, inner space.  These objects “pay tribute to mankind and our never ending journey to a deeper understanding of oneself and each other, seeking a harmonious and purposeful life on our planet.” While Bremers’ sculptures often achieve an impressive feeling of place—whether icy-blue glaciers or russet-red rocks—his goal is not to merely show us how something looks. His recent metaphorical works prove him to be more than a landscape artist. Instead, he evokes awe, both literal and spiritual. Through his insightful representation of Earth’s most majestic and precarious spaces, Bremers instills an elevated sense of responsibility for its preservation.

Blue Iceberg,  in the Scotia Sea in Antarctica

Seth Resnick, Blue Iceberg, in the Scotia Sea in Antarctica

With his camera, Resnick has an in depth conversation with the Earth that surrounds him. Resnick wants his viewers to see his photographs as an opportunity to consider the larger, unseen realities that contribute to the energy and uniqueness of his subjects. “For me it is all about the patterns of waves from water, ice and sand and I find them mesmerizing. My images are a journey into the personal space of my subject.”

waves-15-dim-27-5x43-5x4inch

Peter Bremers, Waves, 2015, 24 x 9.6 x 5.2″

On exhibit in both locations, the works are expected to create a dialogue about the natural world that transcends medium. The artists share a similar aesthetic and vision, as both are masters of light; and both have experienced and endeavored to depict the sublimity encountered in nature, from the Antarctic icebergs to desert canyons. Capturing these moments in time, and continuing the dialogue for the earth, has probably never been more important than now.

Sohn Fine Art is located nearby at 69 Church Street, Lenox MA. www.sohnfineart.com

To view a catalog of works by Peter Bremers, click the link below, or view available works here.

 

Posted in ART, Artist, EVENTS, GALLERY NEWS, NEW WORKS | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Classical, Native and Pop Culture in Glass

3 friends at Schantz 2016 header narrow

Karl Marx wrote in 1845 that “only in community with others has each individual the means of cultivating his gifts in all directions.” The interconnectedness of Richard Marquis, Dante Marioni, and Preston Singletary, cultivated throughout the years, has not created a vacuum of homogeneity in glass. Rather, as these three distinct artists demonstrate, the community of glass has given each individual the “means of cultivating his gift in all directions.”

Richard Marquis, Whole Elk Tower with Manikins, 2015

Richard Marquis, Whole Elk Tower with Manikins, 2015.  Blown glass,murrine whole elk technique,found objects, 17.5 x 19 x 13″

 Schantz Galleries is pleased to present an exhibition of works by three contemporary artists working in glass.  Having worked together on and off over the past 30 years, and maintained a friendship, the three men are each masters of their techniques and have developed extremely different thematic concerns over the years.  Each in their own time has studied and then taught their specialized techniques.

Setter Head Bottle Vehicle Richard Marquis 2016 Glass: hot slab construction, cast glass, wood, brass 7 x 18 x 7"

Richard Marquis, Setter Head Bottle Vehicle, 2016.  Glass: hot slab construction, cast glass, wood, and brass. 7 x 18 x 7″

With over 50 years of experience and a sophisticated understanding of material, color, and form, Richard Marquis balances his training and scrupulous artistic integrity with the playfulness and capacious spirit of an upstart, full of original notions just waiting to burst out in creative action. Simultaneously ironic yet refined, silly yet smart, eclectic yet recognizable, Marquis is nothing if not totally, authentically himself. In part, Marquis’ style emerged from 1960s California funk (he got his B.A. and M.A. from U.C. Berkeley), a counter-movement to east coast Minimalism fusing, among other things, pop-culture, a cartoon aesthetic, and the use of found objects.

Marioni Leaf Vessel Grouping, 2016

Dante Marioni, Leaf Vessels, 2016.  Blown glass, greatest height is 42″

 

Dante Marioni ­grew up in the thick of the studio art glass movement and first met Marquis when he was 7. When Marioni got into glass as a teen, he felt disconnected with what he called the “loose and free-form” aesthetic that characterized the movement in the 1970s. He has said that “over the course of my career I have been consumed mostly with forms—that is, making interesting shapes. As a glass blower, I have always considered that to be my primary challenge.”

Preston Singletary, Supernatural Being, 2016, 13 x 12 x 12"

Preston Singletary, Supernatural Being, 2016.  13 x 12 x 12″

Preston Singletary uses glass a means of understanding, and sharing, his Tlingit heritage in the context of modern society. He explains that he compares “my current notion of society with that of my ancestors, intuiting ideas and concepts in glass, referencing my connection to my Tribe, my clan and my family. My influences range from Indigenous art around the world to the glass-blowing process, modernist sculpture, design and music.” Though he considered a career in music, he realized that glass-making gave him a purpose and a responsibility, to “interpret the codes and symbols of the land in a new way.”

Preston Singeltary

Preston Singletary, Tlingit Shelf Baskets, 2015. Blown and sand carved glass, greatest height is 8.75″

The unique cultures of the Pacific Northwest, both past and present, encourage friendship, a sharing of ideas, and cooperative efforts. This is certainly true of Richard Marquis, Dante Marioni, and Preston Singletary. From pop to classical to native, from murrini to cane to sandblasting, from witty to refined to narrative, Marquis, Marioni, and Singletary demonstrate the endless possibilities when the creative mind meets molten glass and fire.

PHOTOS: Richard Marquis, Manikins, 2016; Dante Marioni,  Leaf Vessels, 2016; Preston Singletary, Blue Tooth, 2016. photo credits: R.Marquis, K.Saul, Russell Johnson

 

IF YOU GO:

POP, CLASSICAL, and NATIVE CULTURES IN GLASS (THREE OLD FRIENDS): Richard Marquis, Dante Marioni, and Preston Singletary

Exhibition September 9 – October 4, 2016

Gallery Hours:  11 a.m.–5 p.m.

Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, 3 Elm Street, Stockbridge, Massachusetts 01262

Tel: 413-298-3044  www.schantzgalleries.com

For more information, email Kim Saul at kim@schantzgalleries.com

Posted in ART, EVENTS, GALLERY NEWS, NEW WORKS, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Place of Wonder – Essay by Jeanne Koles

Schantz Galleries

Schantz Galleries, July 2016

It is our tendency, in an attempt to understand an artist, to contextualize him or her within certain frameworks, whether they be of medium, time and place, or style. We lapse into simplified definitions in order to better grasp an artist’s motivations and better appreciate the person’s vision. These habits have their intellectual purpose but fall short in explaining our visceral response in the presence of art. Dale Chihuly is an artist who cannot be wrapped in a box. He is an intuitive thinker, a citizen of his imagination, the chief of his own creative tribe. Cultural assimilations shift effortlessly, and his artwork adjusts with facility according to his inspiration. He is educated in global and historical trends and looks to certain artistic forebears for creative guidance. But he is not limited by borders, expectations, conventions, or—given the unpredictability when glass meets fire—even by the edges of his own mind.

Jim Schantz admires the Clear Platinum Hornet Chandelier, 2016, 53 x 36 x 36"

Jim Schantz admires the Clear Platinum Hornet Chandelier, 2016, 53 x 36 x 36″

When the first glass chandeliers were illuminated by candle three hundred years ago, their makers realized that the simple refraction of light off glass produced a sumptuous effect. Chihuly’s Chandeliers amplify the light’s dance through uncommon scale, shape, and color. Cascading nests of serpentine elements in Sunrise Topaz Chandelier reflect in a conflagration of golden reds and oranges, while turbulent shadows climb the walls like wild, tentacled ivy. A single element and tone is repeated hundreds of times in Clear Platinum Hornet Chandelier, aggrandizing the elemental through repetition. An infinite collection of individual moments of reflection explodes into a buzzing optical hive.

Clear Venetian with Indigo Flowers, 2012, 22 x 14 x 12"

Clear Venetian with Indigo Flowers, 2012, 22 x 14 x 12″

The Ikebana series evolved as a foil to the Venetian series, a set of vases that were never meant to evoke functionality or the beauty of use. These vessels were inspired by a visit to a private collection of Venetian Art Deco glass from the 1920s and 1930s, which Chihuly described as “odd, with garish colors. Most were classical shapes with beautiful handles and other unusual additions.” Instead of containing nature, the canonical vaselike body of Clear Venetian with Indigo Flowers becomes the nucleus around which the exuberant flowers flourish. Instead of a vase with conventional handles, Magenta Piccolo Venetian with Fuchsia Leaves is a bulb enveloped by flaming leaves, reaching up and licking the sky. The Venetians are unconventional in their use of ornamentation, and also stunning in the treatment of the glass itself.

Various dates

Black Cylinder Grouping, various dates.

Chihuly’s Cylinders use an economy of form to privilege design and allow the surface of the glass to become a canvas. Using a technique he calls “pick-up drawing,” his team first creates a detailed glass drawing out of hundreds of glass threads and places that drawing on a steel surface called a marvering table. The Cylinder is then blown in the traditional way. Just after the final gather of glass, the Cylinder is rolled over the drawing, fusing it to the surface. Inspired by Native American textiles, the black surfaces tremble with dynamism. Swirling orbs overlay whipping strands and frame enigmatic symbols, sometimes gathering just loosely enough to form the image of something recognizable.

Schantz Galleries

A wall of Chihuly’s Drawings greets visitors as they enter the gallery.

For Chihuly, drawing is not limited to surface decoration but is an art in and of itself, both independent of and reciprocal with the glass work. Chihuly’s works on paper, which began in the 1970s as a means of communication—illustrating his ideas to glassblowers, or to collaborators who spoke in foreign tongues—became energetic interpretations of form, color, and mark making. These drawings celebrate the limitlessness of Chihuly’s creative imagination, containing forms without edges, sweeping gestures leaping off the page, and designs that have achieved sovereignty from the glass objects they were meant to decorate or inspire. His discovery of Golden liquid acrylics, sold in plastic squeeze bottles, allowed him to experiment more freely with the application of the material and precipitate effects ranging from circles to splashes, dots to lines. Timothy Anglin Burgard, author of the essay in The Art of Dale Chihuly, wrote, “Emulating [Jackson] Pollock’s famous drip and pour techniques . . . , Chihuly squirts, pours, and drips these paints onto a paper or canvas support laid on the ground . . . and then spreads them with brushes, brooms, and his own hands, thus giving physical form to his stream-of-consciousness aesthetic.”

Dale Chihuly’s oeuvre is as much a cultural journey as it is a passport into the world of his imagination. The Persians resonate with the notion that Chihuly does not emulate, he creates. The Persians are so named not because of any direct connection with a place but because they evoke the alluring romanticism associated with orientalism. Sienna Yellow Persian Set with Flame Orange Lip Wraps is a billowing sea creature, steadfast despite its gossamer shell, simultaneously so natural it feels as if it might take a breath and so fantastical we know it must be art. Chihuly defies neat categorization and cannot be pinned down by tidy art historical parlance. This creative freedom yields a varied and awe-inspiring body of work—allowing viewers to escape their own box and venture into a borderless place of wonder.

Schantz Galleries

Sienna Yellow Persian, 2002, 14 x 27 x 18″

Jeanne Koles is an independent museum professional with a focus on cultural communications.

Thanks to Lisa Vollmer for the images of our gallery.

Posted in ART, Artist | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Renowned Artist Dale Chihuly to Exhibit in Stockbridge

Chihuly at Schantz Galleries 2016

Opening Reception, Friday, July 8, 2016, 4–6 p.m.

Dale Chihuly, Sunrise Topaz Chandelier, 2016 detail

Dale Chihuly, Sunrise Topaz Chandelier (detail), 2016, 14 x 6 x 5½’

 

Stockbridge, MA (July 2016) Renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly will exhibit several of his works of art to include two large Chandeliers and a Persian Wall, at the Schantz Galleries in Stockbridge, MA, from July 8 through August 28, 2016. While Chihuly is famous for his ambitious architectural installations in notable cities, museums, and gardens around the world, Schantz Galleries provides visitors with a more intimate setting in which to enjoy the works on view.

With a background in interior design and architecture, Chihuly has always been interested in space and light. Working within the architecture of the gallery, he presents several of his well-known series along with a few large-scale installations. The centerpiece of the gallery is Sunrise Topaz Chandelier, a two-tiered Chandelier consisting of approximately 430 amber, gold, and clear elements.

An American sculptor, Chihuly has mastered the alluring, translucent, and transparent qualities of glass, ice, water, and neon, to create works of art that transform the viewer experience. He is globally renowned for his ambitious, site-specific architectural installations in public spaces and for his work in more than 250 museum collections.

In addition to the blown-glass sculptures, Chihuly has included sixteen of his works on paper. As Nathan Kernan has stated in an essay, “Drawing into Space: Chihuly Drawing Revisited,” Chihuly’s drawings over the past thirty-five years constitute a parallel visual world as compelling and original as that of his amazing sculptures.” The artist has always used drawing as a form of conveying his concepts and ideas for his sculptures, and one can certainly experience his expressive energy and love of color. “You can more directly sense my energy in my drawings than in any other way, perhaps,” he has said. “And from the very beginning, the drawings were done, as my glass is done, very quickly, very fast.”

­­­­“We are truly honored to have the opportunity to exhibit works by Dale Chihuly in Stockbridge. Chihuly is one of the most well known living American artists,” gallery owner and director Jim Schantz stated, “and certainly the most recognized glass artist in the world today.”

IF YOU GO:

Chihuly at Schantz Galleries 2016

July 8 through August 28, 2016

Opening Reception Friday, July 8, 2016, 4–6 p.m.

Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, 3 Elm Street, Stockbridge, Massachusetts 01262

Tel: 413-298-3044   http://www.schantzgalleries.com

Exhibition Hours: Open Daily, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Posted in ART, Artist, EVENTS, GALLERY NEWS, NEW WORKS | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NANCY CALLAN | A Fantastic Journey

Catalog Available

Click to view online catalog. Printed catalogs are available.                           photo: Russell Johnson

It is apparent when an artist loves what he or she does. Nancy Callan’s work reflects her pure joy and energy and good nature. While the work connotes a playful ease, it is created with great technical skill and mastery. We truly admire Nancy’s great energy and dedication—she has become a major force in the art glass community as an artist, gaffer, educator and mentor.

5.5 x 5.5 x 5.5" each elementBlown & Fused Glass

Nancy Callan, Top Sampler #3, 2016,  5.5 x 5.5 x 5.5″ (each element)

The works in this exhibition, Dancers, Orbs, Tops, and Clouds, all have a rich diversity of character and style reflecting Nancy’s early career as a graphic designer. Each work projects its own character, denoting a place, person or mood, offering its own narrative.

juliasgarden-callan

Julia’s Garden, 2016, and on site installation by Nancy Callan, at Chesterwood, Stockbridge, MA

In addition to being a featured artist at our June Collectors Weekend, Nancy is also one of the twelve exhibiting artists at the outdoor exhibition at Chesterwood, a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  The exhibition, “The Nature of Glass: Contemporary Sculpture at Chesterwood 2016” Opens June 18 in Stockbridge and runs through September 18, 2016.

IndigoAnemone_web

Nancy Callan, Indigo Anemone Paloma, 2016, 25.5 x 13 x 8.5″.

We feel very fortunate to represent Nancy’s work and to know her. Enjoy this fantastic journey into Nancy’s world!  We hope you can come to the gallery this summer to see the work in person, but if not, please view additional works by Nancy Callan on our website.

 

 

Posted in ART, Artist, EVENTS, GALLERY NEWS, NEW WORKS | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment